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  1. Extract Google Earth 3D models with Pix4D and PV*SOL premium 2018 http://www.valentin-software.com/services/fw/yt-tut-en/dl-pvsolprem-en [Full Traskript] 1. Create screenshots in Google Earth Pro 2. Photogrammetry with Pix4D 3. Import of the 3D model into PV*SOL premium First, start Google Earth Pro. For this video I chose a free-standing, relatively complex building in England. Here I enter the coordinates of the object. A 3D model is to be extracted from this object. First, I determine the size of an edge of the model. This is later used in PV*SOL to reproduce the scale. To do this I use the ruler function of Google Earth and draw a 3D path to an edge that is well visible. The measured length of the edge is approx. 20m. In the next step I will take about 30 - 40 screenshots of the scene to create a 3D model in Pix4D. In order to achieve an optimal result with photogrammetry, all labels and menus should be hidden first. Now the screenshots can be made. Recommendation: take pictures at 3 different altitudes: - 12 pictures at the height of the ridge or the highest point of the building. - 8 pictures from different angles of the bird's eye view - 12 pictures at a height of 3 meters Make sure - that the target building is always completely visible, - that potential additional shading objects are visible, - and that the pictures are not too twisted. The more images that are created from different perspectives, the better the 3D model created later on will be. In some photogrammetry programs it is useful to take some close-ups as well. Also move the mouse out of the picture before creating the screenshot, so that the mouse cursor is not visible in the picture! After you have made the 30-40 screenshots, start Pix4Desktop. You can currently download this program as a 14-day trial version by creating a customer account on: https://pix4d.com/product/pix4dmapper-photogrammetry-software/ After you have started Pix4Dmapper Pro, you will be taken to the "Home" page of the program. First, create a new project. The "New Project"dialog opens. Here you can select the project folder. Enter the project name here. In the next step the screenshots will be added. Click on "Add Images". Now select all screenshots with "Ctrl-A". The following message can be ignored. Here you can now see an overview of the geodata and the camera model, which were determined from the images. Due to the fact that I made screenshots, not much data is included. The following pages are currently not interesting. Click your way through. On the last page you can see an overview of the level of detail expected for the finished 3D model and how long the creation process will probably take. Select the menu item "3D Models" and then click "Finish". The map view is now displayed. This is not interesting at the moment, because there is no geoinformation in the pictures. The next step is to create the 3D model. Before I click on "Start", let's first look at the options for this. Click "Process", and then click "Process Options". At first, only the settings for "Process" and "Point Cloud and Mesh"are interesting. I leave the general process options unchanged. Make sure that "Keypoints Image Scale" --> "Full" is selected. You can experiment a little later on with the settings for the "Point Cloud" to get an even better result. I leave the settings unchanged. A few things have to be adapted to the mesh options so that the 3D model can be imported correctly into PV*SOL premium later on. I want the textures from the screenshots to be transferred into the 3D model. We set the "Maximum Octree Depth" to 14. The maximum "Texture Size" should be 4096 pixels. The maximum number of triangles has to be limited for the level of detail, because PV*SOL premium currently only accepts 3D models with a maximum of 500,000 points. You can achieve this with the decimation strategy "Sensitive". A model file is automatically generated after photogrammetry is complete. Here you specify that this file is to be created in obj format. Now the 3D model can be created. First, perform step 1 only! This process can take several minutes. I'm fast-forwarding. The result now shows the reproduced positions of the camera and the tie points. The camera positions can be hidden. Unfortunately, the program sometimes has difficulties in determining the correct position of the model from the screenshots. Here you can see a completely unnatural slope which has to be corrected. The "Orientation Constraints" function is used to correct the alignment and inclination of the model. Place the ends of the 3D arrow at a distance you know to be parallel to the height axis. (Here z-axis!!) Step 1 must now be revised. The model has now been corrected. Next, the triangle mesh can be generated. I'm fast-forwarding again. Now the 3D model is already complete and can be viewed. If you want to view the mesh, you must first activate "Triangle Meshes". I just want to view the triangulated mesh and disable the other elements. You can see that the 3D model is already close to the Google original. Now open PV*SOL premium 2018 or a higher version! I am already in the 3D visualization of PV*SOL premium and have started a new project there. Now import the 3D model you created with Pix4D. To do so, click this button. You will find the. obj file, as well as materials and texture in the project folder that Pix4D has created. I simply place the 3D model in the middle of the terrain. As you can see, the 3D model is stored in an unusual coordinate system, which has to be corrected. To do this, double-click on the model and select the "Tilt backward" option. The model has also been well imported into PV*SOL premium. Here already with representation of the shading. Now check the distance measured in Google Earth. To do this, draw a PV area polygon. As you can see, the model is not to scale. It must be corrected (see video). The alignment must also be adjusted! The building can then be covered with PV modules. End of the tutorial. Thank you for watching! The computer program shown is PV*SOL premium, a design software by Valentin Software in the field of photovoltaics / renewable energy. The priorities of this software are design support and yield calculation. The integrated 3D visualization determines the impact of shading on the yield. Another focus is on the cost-effectiveness of photovoltaic systems with and without self-consumption
  2. http://www.valentin-software.com/services/fw/yt-val-en/dl-pvsolprem-en [Transkript] In this tutorial you will learn how to use photo matching to model your building with SketchUp and use it in PV*SOL premium. "You will need: - Two Pictures of the building you like to model - SketchUp Make or Pro - PV*SOL premium 2018" The pictures should be taken at a 45° angle from two opposite corners. Next we create a folder structure containing our project data. Create a new folder, rename it and create three subfolders "Models", "Images" and "Exports". Drop the pictures into the "Images" folder. Start SketchUp. Activate the used tools by right click the toolbar and select the tools as needed. Open the drop down menu "Camera" and select "Match New Photo...". Navigate to your "Images" folder and select an image. The yellow square is the origin of the coordinates. The red line is the x-axis, green the y-axis and blue the z-axis. Pull the yellow square onto a corner of the roof. The corner should be visible from both pictures. Now drag the y-axes (green dashed line) on two parallel edges of the building and align them with the green squares at the end of the lines. Do the same with the x-axis. The x- and y-edges of the house must be offset by 90° to the y axis. To check the alignment, you can drag the origin to another corner of the house. The z-axis should coincide with a vertical edge of the house. For adjusting you can use the x- and y-axis handles. Check the alignment with other edges of the house. When you hover with your mouse over the z axis, the cursor changes into two little arrows. Click with the left mouse button and change the scale by moving the mouse. To complete the photo match click with the right mouse button and select "done". Select the Rectangular Tool and draw the base surface of the front roof from the coordinate origin. Select the Tape Measure Tool, move the mouse over the z-axis until a red square appears. Then click with the left mouse button and move the guide line to the center point (blue circle) of the edge. Select the line tool and draw the front edge of the roof. Make sure that the end point of the line is on the guide line. If you press the middle mouse button and hold it down, you can rotate the view by moving the mouse. Draw the remaining edges of the roof. If you click on the blue tab, the scene changes back to the photo match view. Left click three times to select the whole model. Then click with the right mouse button and select "Make Group". If there is no volume, there is either an open area, a single line or an area within the body. Check if the object has a volume. If there is no volume, there is either an open area, a single line or an area within the body. Select the Rectangular Tool and draw the base of the remaining roof. With activated Select Tool mark the edge and drag it with the Move Tool. Draw a vertical guide line through the middle of the edge. It's time to match the second picture. Repeat the steps from the first photo match. The coordinate origin is located on the same roof corner and the axes must have the same alignment. Adjust the house edge with the move tool. Rematch the first picture by right click on the tab and select "Edit Matched Photo". Adjust the x and y-axis a little bit so that the rear edge of the roof matches the picture. When ready, right click and select "Done". Using the Tape Measure Tool, click on the slanted roof edge and type in 0. The guide line should be on the edge. Draw a vertical guide line through the center of the page. Select the Line Tool and draw the side of the roof from the intersection point of the guide lines. Remove the guide lines by clicking on edit in the menu bar and select "Delete Guides". Left click three times to select the whole model. Then click with the right mouse button and select "Make Group". Check if the object has a volume. If there is no volume, there is either an open area, a single line or an area within the body. Now we model the chimneys and roof windows. Select the Line Tool and draw on the surface of the roof. Move the cursor over the top edge of the roof and look for the pink 90° offset reference line. Extrude the surface with the Push/Pull Tool by about 1 cm. To do this, select the tool, then click on the area and type in 0.01. With the Line Tool you can model the chimney. When drawing the lines, make sure that you snap into the axes (x, y, z). The drawn line is colored according to the reference axes. The color of the surfaces is darker than the remaining surfaces. This is because the normal of the flats are twisted. The dark areas should be inside the object. To invert, right-click on the surface and select "Reverse Faces". In order for an object to become a solid body, there must be no surfaces within the object. The internal surface of the chimney must be removed. To do this, we select the area and delete it with the Delete key. Left click three times to select the whole model. Then click with the right mouse button and select "Make Group". Repeat the steps for modelling the remaining roof details. This time we don't create a group, but choose "Make Component...". The difference between a group and a component is the linking of copies of these objects. This means that changes to a copy of a component are automatically applied to all other copies of that component. There are three identical roof windows. We only model one window and make copies of the component. If we want to change the roof window in retrospect, we only have to change one copy. To make a copy of the window, select the move tool and press the ctrl on the keyboard. A small plus on the cursor indicates that we are in copy mode. Then we go to a corner of the window and click with the left mouse button. Now we drag the copy to the next window position. Next we model the roof frame. First of all, we draw the shape of the frame with the Line Tool. Then we draw the roof shape. For a better view we move the objects to individual layers. To do this, we click on the plus sign in the layer section of the side menu and then we name our new layer. Afterwards we mark the objects and change the layer in the section "Entity Info" in the side menu to the newly created layer and we uncheck the Visible option. Repeat the steps for the other models. Mark the surface. Then select the Follow Me Tool and click on the shape of the roof frame. The color of the surfaces is darker than the remaining surfaces. This is because the normal of the surfaces are twisted. The dark areas should be inside the object. To invert, right-click on one surface and select "Reverse Faces". Then right-click again and choose "Orient Faces". Delete the surface. Triple click on the model and "make group". Check if a volume is displayed. Move the objects to individual layers. To do this, we click on the plus sign in the layer section of the side menu and then we name our new layer. Afterwards we mark the objects and change the layer in the section "Entity Info" in the side menu to the newly created layer and we uncheck the Visible option. To model the ground floor, we need reference lines. To do this, we select the Tape Measure Tool and move a reference to the z-axis (blue) to the house edge. It is important that the reference line is "drawn" on the roof, otherwise it hangs somewhere in the 3d-room and has no relation to the house. Then we use the Line Tool to draw an edge from the reference line along the y-axis. The Line Tool automatically snaps into the x-axis. Then we move the edge with the move tool along the reference line until it matches the house edge. Repeat the steps for the remaining edges. Delete protruding edges with the Erase Tool. Then use the Pull/Push Tool to extrude the ground surface. Save your project in the models folder. Next we assign materials to the objects. To do this, we open the material menu and select the desired materials. For simplicity's sake, I use the materials that are already in the model. To apply the materials, we simply click on the desired object. To export the model we select in the file menu export > 3d model. We select "*. dae" file and click on options. Select "Triangulate All Faces" and "Export Texture Maps". Click on "Export". "In PV*SOL premium select the import option, load the exported model and drag it into the simulation environment. The scale of the model may need to be adjusted." Your model is ready for simulation. Thank you for watching. As texture we use the background images from the Photo Match perspectives. Activate the Photo Match view by clicking on the corresponding tab. Double-click on the "Roof" object to activate it. Then select the roof surface. Then right-click and choose "Project Photo". Repeat the steps for all visible surfaces of your object. Do the same with the other objects of the house. If the question is asked: "Trim partially visible faces?" it is important to answer with "no". Repeat the steps for all objects with both views.
  3. Here is our new tutorial on how to connect multiple module areas on one MPP tracker (polystring) and how to use power optimizers in the new PV*SOL premium 2018. Also refer to this thread: We hope it helps! Kind regards, Martin
  4. Program options and presentation This tutorial gives an overview on how to customize PV*SOL premium for your needs. The program options and the setup of the presentation will be explained. After starting PV*SOL premium you can enter the options via the menu bar in the upper left corner. "User Data" and "Program Options" will both open the options menu on different sections. "Reset" restores either the default options from the installation or an user defined reset point. After clicking "User Data" the options dialog opens to the section where you can indicate your company information. These will be added to the final presentation. Your logo can be loaded in bmp, gif, jpg and jpeg format. Save as default to easily restore your input anytime you want. This applies to all the configurations made in the options menu. The “Extended” section lets you choose the default directory for your projects. You can also set the unit system your project is based on. For the currency, the decimal and the thousands delimiter PV*SOL uses your system settings. Follow the link to change them. It is highly recommended to leave the four boxes below checked to keep your software up to date and get help when problems occur. In the Reset section you can restore all options and databases to delivery status. User-created data will be lost! The Project Options are specific for your current project. For every new project they will be reset to the installation default or, if created, the user default. All the sections are also linked in the corresponding steps of the simulation process. In AC Mains you can adjust the grid properties to your local conditions. The feed-in power clipping and the saved emissions may vary for every project. The saving of 600 g/kWh is a typical value for Germany. In the Simulation section you can define the losses you want to include in the simulation process. Premium users can decide if they want to use the shading calculated from the 3D modeling. The irradiance can be simulated with one-minute values that include a synthesized cloudiness. In this case the simulation process will take longer, but is more accurate. For a precise analysis of your system you might want to have a more detailed look at the radiation distribution. You can do this for the entire system or certain module areas. The losses for the PV system can be entered globally or for every module area individually. The albedo and soiling losses can be entered for the entire year or for each month. Typical albedo values of different surfaces can be found in the PV*SOL help. Soiling losses depend heavily on the location of your system. Dry areas with flat tilt angles may suffer from higher losses. In the Configuration Limits section you can define the electrical limits of the suggested configurations for your system. The sizing factor can be changed manually or be calculated based on your systems specifications. Of course you can always use your own configuration. In this case you will receive a warning message if the sizing exceeds the tolerances but you will still be able to simulate. The unbalanced load should match the requirements of your local grid. You can choose wether you want to include it in your simulation. The same applies for the max. system voltage. In the automatic configuration section you can make some adjustments on how PV*SOL will configure your solar system. Choose how many configurations will be shown on one page and if the previously set tolerance areas should be included. In case your inverter has more than one MPP tracker you should determine how those will be integrated. You cannot have more than two different types of inverters in the configuration. The View Presentation section lets you configure the presentation to your own needs. Not included elements will not be shown. You can also leave out entire sections like the financial analysis if you just want to have a technical overview. There is also an option to export the presentation in a big variety of additional languages. If not selected, the program language is chosen. The resolution of the pictures and screenshots in the presentation will be scaled down to keep the data size moderate. If you need them in higher resolution or in a bigger format just check the boxes at the bottom. In simulation results section you can decide how your simulated data will be saved. The simulation with hourly and minute values takes longer than with monthly values. If you save the results in the project file, the next simulation will be a lot quicker. Mind that the project file will be a lot bigger than normally. You can also choose the units and separators for the detailed export file. Depending on the number of module areas those files can be very large. The one-minute simulation generates over 500.000 values for each parameter. Type of video: Tutorial, Lesson, Exercise, Practice, Presentation, Demonstration Type of featured software: PV-SOL premium: Photovoltaic Application, Solar Calculator, 3D-Visualization, CAD-Tool, 3D-Sketchup-Tool, Shading Generator, Time-Step Simulation Program, Planning Software, Calculation Program, Spreadsheet Program, Economy Software Features: (Virtual) Photovoltaic System, PV Module, Solar Module, Solar Panel, Solar Cells, PV Array, Free Standing, Rack Mounted Arrays, Inverter, Inverter Configuration, PV Array Configuration, Grid-connected System, Stand-alone PV Systems, Planning, Sizing, Commissioning, System Concept, Inverter Concept, Electricity Consumption, Yield Calculation, Storage, MPP Tracking, 3D-Visualization, Shading Analysis, Shading Animation, Profit Calculation, Profitability Assessment Business Field: Renewable Energy, Sustainable Energy, New Energies, Environmental Engineering, Climate Change, Climate Protection, Decentralized Energy Supply, Solar Energies, Photovoltaics, Power Grid, Market Incentive Program, Solar Market, Customers: PV Planer, Plant Engineers, Craftsmen, Experts, Specialists, Plumbers, Consultants, Installation Firms, Commercial Customers, Manufacturers, System Developers, Universities, Students, Trainees
  5. Transskript: Software Tutorial PV*SOL premium Map Import and Extrusion Of 3D Objects (Since Version 2016) This tutorial shows how quickly and easily you can create simple standard buildings and configure a photovoltaic system in PV*SOL premium 2016 without a costly local meeting. In this release, many time-consuming steps have been simplified, considerably accelerating the design process. This is achieved mainly through the new features "Map Import" and "Extrusion Of 3D Objects" First, start PV*SOL premium 2016 or a later version. You are now on the "Welcome Page" of the application. We will now reproduce a simple house with a hipped roof. Please begin a new project. We have chosen Los Angeles as the location. Now click on the button "3D Design" and then on the overview screen to get into the "3D Visualization". In the dialog "New 3D System" click on the button "Coverable Object" and select the menu item "Map Section" in the drop down menu. Now you see an expanded view of the dialog, in which a city map is shown on the top right. Click on it. This opens a new dialog with a large map. The map service that provides the map data is "Bing Maps" from Mircrosoft. This service offers high-resolution aerial photographs, especially in urban areas. An address field is located on the top left, in which you can mark off the location of the building. We are interested in this object. Use the arrow buttons and the buttons with the magnifying glass icon next to the address field to adjust the map section, so that the target building and relevant surrounding shading objects can be seen on it. You can scroll with the mouse wheel and you can move the image with the left mouse button. The resulting "pixels per meter" determined by the map service are shown in the field "scale". If you have different data available, you can change the value. Alternatively, you can also use your own map sections, floor plans or cadastral maps and upload them as image files from the hard disk. Click on "Start" to begin the project. The software zooms immediately into the "Object View" on the map, and you can begin to sketch the floor plans. At first we sketch a polygon for the target building. Click on this button to begin the process. The polygon can be drawn by clicking on the map section. Please draw accurately. You can interrupt tracing and draw a further polygon with the Enter Key. Because the house is a building with a hipped roof, we draw a distance which marks the ridge in the next step. With the Right Mouse Button or the Escape Key you can terminate the sketching. If you have forgotten a corner, you can insert it by pressing the Shift Key + Mouse Click later on. The plan can then be extruded. Click on the polygon and select the context menu item "Extrude 3D Object". It opens the dialog "Recognize 3D Object". Since the ridge is drawn slightly shorter than the longer side of the ground floor, the structure was automatically recognized as "Rectangular 3D Object With Ridge" and a "Building With Hipped Roof" is then offered as the preselection. All dimensions as well as the orientation are already taken from this building. And the map section, where the house stands, has already been transferred to the roof surfaces of the hipped roof. Now only the data for the eaves must be entered, i.e. the height of the ground floor and the roof slope to the longer eave. This data cannot be read out of the map section and should be requested from the end customer. Here we have some shading caused by a tree. This can also be sketched and will be included in the shading simulation. Since the object is to be covered with PV modules in the next step, it must be added to the coverable objects. Then click "Activate". PV-SOL offers an automatic method of assigning the modules, which guarantees the optimal utilization of the roof space. We can execute a shading analysis now. So hit this button. You will see some moderate shading on the bottom right. The PV module is uneconomical and can be removed. End of tutorial Thanks for watching! For more PV*SOL premium tutorials please check out my channel. You can also start discussions on feed-in tariffs, renewable energy, energy policy, funding, etc. The computer program featured is PV*SOL premium, a design software from Valentin Software in the fields of photovoltaics and renewable energy. The software focuses on design support and yield calculation. The integrated 3D visualization determines the impact of shading on the yield. PVSOL premium also calculates the cost-effectiveness of photovoltaic systems with and without self-consumption. Similar to: Google Sketchup
  6. (Auszug aus dem Transskript) Softwaretutorial PV*SOL premium Kartenimport und Extrudieren von 3D-Objekten (ab Version 2016) Mit PV*SOL premium ist es möglich, einfache Gebäude ohne kostspieligen Vororttermin zu erstellen und schnell mit Solarpanelen zu belegen. Eine Beschleunigung der Angebotsplanung wird durch die Features „Kartenimport“ und „Extrudieren von 3D-Objekten“ erreicht. Starten Sie zunächst PV*SOL premium 2016 oder eine höhere Version. Sie befinden sich nun auf der Willkommensseite der Applikation. Wir werden nun ein einfaches Mehrfamilienhaus mit Walmdach nachstellen. Beginnen Sie hierzu ein neues Projekt. Klicken Sie anschließend auf den Button „3D-Planung“ und auf das Übersichtsbild, um in die 3D-Visualisierung zu gelangen. Im Dialog „Neue 3D-Anlage“ klicken Sie auf den Button „Belegungsobjekt:“ und wählen Sie im aufklappenden Menü den Menüpunkt „Kartenausschnitt“. Es zeigt sich nun eine erweiterte Ansicht des Dialogs, in welcher rechts oben eine Stadtkarte angedeutet ist. Klicken Sie darauf. Es öffnet sich ein Kartendialog. Der Kartendienst, welcher das Kartenmaterial bereitstellt, ist „Bing Maps“ von Microsoft. Dieser Dienst bietet vor allem im innerstädtischen Bereich hochauflösende Luftaufnahmen an. Links oben befindet sich ein Adressfeld, in welchem Sie den Standort des Gebäudes eingrenzen können, auf dessen Dach die PV-Anlage errichtet werden soll. In diesem fiktiven Beispiel geben wir Pasteurstraße Berlin ein. Wir interessieren uns für dieses Objekt Mit den Pfeilbuttons und den Buttons mit der Lupe neben dem Adressfeld können Sie den Kartenausschnitt so anpassen, dass das Zielgebäude und relevante umliegende Abschattungs-Objekte darauf zu sehen sind. Mit dem Scrollrad der Maus können Sie scrollen und mit der linken Maustaste den Bildausschnitt verschieben. Anschließend bestätigen. In dem Feld „Maßstab“ sind nun die vom Kartendienst ermittelten Pixel pro Meter angeben. Sollten Ihnen abweichende Daten vorliegen, können Sie den Wert ändern. Alternativ können Sie auch eigene Kartenausschnitte, Grundrisszeichnungen oder Flurkarten einsetzen und als Bilddatei von der Festplatte laden (Siehe Tutorial: ) Die Software zoomt sofort in die Objektansicht des Kartenausschnitts und es kann mit dem Nachzeichnen der Grundrisse begonnen werden. Als erstes zeichnen wir das Polygon für das Zielgebäude ein. Klicken Sie hierbei auf diesen Button, um den Vorgang zu beginnen. Durch Mausklick auf den Kartenausschnitt können die Eckpunkte eingezeichnet werden. Zeichnen Sie diese möglichst exakt ein. Mit der Enter-Taste können Sie das Nachzeichnen unterbrechen und gleich ein weiteres Polygon einzeichnen. Mit der rechten Maustaste oder der Escape-Taste können Sie das Nachzeichnen beenden. Da es sich bei dem Haus um ein Gebäude mit Walmdach handelt, zeichnen wir im nächsten Schritt eine Strecke ein, mit der wir den Dachfirst markieren. Sollten Sie ein Punkt vergessen haben, können Sie diesen ebenfalls mit gedrückter Shift-Taste + Mausklick nachträglich noch einfügen. Anschließend kann der Grundriss extrudiert werden. Klicken Sie dazu auf das Polygon und wählen Sie im Kontextmenü den Menüpunkt „Extrudieren“. Es öffnet sich der Dialog „3D-Objekt erkennen“. Da der First etwas kürzer gezeichnet ist als die längere Seite des Geschosses wurde die Struktur vom Tool automatisch als „Rechteckiges 3D-Objekt mit First erkannt“ und als Vorauswahl wird bereits ein „Gebäude mit Walmdach“ angeboten. Von diesem Gebäudetyp wurden bereits alle Abmessungen, sowie die Ausrichtung vom Grundriss abgeleitet. Des Weiteren wurde der Kartenausschnitt, welcher vom Grundriss überlagert wurde, bereits auf die Dachflächen des Walmdaches übertragen. Übrig bleiben nun lediglich Angaben zur Traufhöhe des Geschosses und zur Dachneigung bzgl. der längeren Traufe. Diese Daten können nicht aus dem Kartenausschnitt ausgelesen werden und sollten beim Endkunden angefragt werden. Da das Objekt nun im nächsten Schritt mit Solarstrommodulen belegt werden soll, muss es zu den Belegungsobjekten hinzugefügt werden. Anschließend klicken Sie auf Aktivieren. Für die Modulbelegung bietet PV*SOL ein automatisches Verfahren an, welches eine optimale Platzausnutzung des Daches ermittelt. Hierzu müssen bestimmte Bereiche des Daches gesperrt werden. Da der Kartenausschnitt auf die Dächer übertragen wurde, sind auch weitere Dachaufbauten zu erkennen, welche ebenfalls nachgezeichnet werden können. Sind alle Verschattungs- und Sperrobjekte definiert, kann die automatische Belegung mit Solar-Panelen erfolgen. Dazu wählen wir zunächst ein PV-Modul aus und betätigen diesen Button. Ende des Tutorials Vielen Dank für's Zuschauen.
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