Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'google earth'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • [English] Photovoltaics
    • FAQ (Read only)
    • PV*SOL
    • Tutorials (Read only)
  • [English] Solarthermal / Geothermal
    • FAQ (Read only)
    • T*SOL
    • GeoT*SOL
  • [Deutsch] Photovoltaik
    • FAQ (Nur lesen)
    • PV*SOL
    • Tutorials (Nur lesen)
  • [Deutsch] Solarthermie / Geothermie
    • FAQ (Nur lesen)
    • T*SOL
    • GeoT*SOL

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 3 results

  1. Extract Google Earth 3D models with Pix4D and PV*SOL premium 2018 http://www.valentin-software.com/services/fw/yt-tut-en/dl-pvsolprem-en [Full Traskript] 1. Create screenshots in Google Earth Pro 2. Photogrammetry with Pix4D 3. Import of the 3D model into PV*SOL premium First, start Google Earth Pro. For this video I chose a free-standing, relatively complex building in England. Here I enter the coordinates of the object. A 3D model is to be extracted from this object. First, I determine the size of an edge of the model. This is later used in PV*SOL to reproduce the scale. To do this I use the ruler function of Google Earth and draw a 3D path to an edge that is well visible. The measured length of the edge is approx. 20m. In the next step I will take about 30 - 40 screenshots of the scene to create a 3D model in Pix4D. In order to achieve an optimal result with photogrammetry, all labels and menus should be hidden first. Now the screenshots can be made. Recommendation: take pictures at 3 different altitudes: - 12 pictures at the height of the ridge or the highest point of the building. - 8 pictures from different angles of the bird's eye view - 12 pictures at a height of 3 meters Make sure - that the target building is always completely visible, - that potential additional shading objects are visible, - and that the pictures are not too twisted. The more images that are created from different perspectives, the better the 3D model created later on will be. In some photogrammetry programs it is useful to take some close-ups as well. Also move the mouse out of the picture before creating the screenshot, so that the mouse cursor is not visible in the picture! After you have made the 30-40 screenshots, start Pix4Desktop. You can currently download this program as a 14-day trial version by creating a customer account on: https://pix4d.com/product/pix4dmapper-photogrammetry-software/ After you have started Pix4Dmapper Pro, you will be taken to the "Home" page of the program. First, create a new project. The "New Project"dialog opens. Here you can select the project folder. Enter the project name here. In the next step the screenshots will be added. Click on "Add Images". Now select all screenshots with "Ctrl-A". The following message can be ignored. Here you can now see an overview of the geodata and the camera model, which were determined from the images. Due to the fact that I made screenshots, not much data is included. The following pages are currently not interesting. Click your way through. On the last page you can see an overview of the level of detail expected for the finished 3D model and how long the creation process will probably take. Select the menu item "3D Models" and then click "Finish". The map view is now displayed. This is not interesting at the moment, because there is no geoinformation in the pictures. The next step is to create the 3D model. Before I click on "Start", let's first look at the options for this. Click "Process", and then click "Process Options". At first, only the settings for "Process" and "Point Cloud and Mesh"are interesting. I leave the general process options unchanged. Make sure that "Keypoints Image Scale" --> "Full" is selected. You can experiment a little later on with the settings for the "Point Cloud" to get an even better result. I leave the settings unchanged. A few things have to be adapted to the mesh options so that the 3D model can be imported correctly into PV*SOL premium later on. I want the textures from the screenshots to be transferred into the 3D model. We set the "Maximum Octree Depth" to 14. The maximum "Texture Size" should be 4096 pixels. The maximum number of triangles has to be limited for the level of detail, because PV*SOL premium currently only accepts 3D models with a maximum of 500,000 points. You can achieve this with the decimation strategy "Sensitive". A model file is automatically generated after photogrammetry is complete. Here you specify that this file is to be created in obj format. Now the 3D model can be created. First, perform step 1 only! This process can take several minutes. I'm fast-forwarding. The result now shows the reproduced positions of the camera and the tie points. The camera positions can be hidden. Unfortunately, the program sometimes has difficulties in determining the correct position of the model from the screenshots. Here you can see a completely unnatural slope which has to be corrected. The "Orientation Constraints" function is used to correct the alignment and inclination of the model. Place the ends of the 3D arrow at a distance you know to be parallel to the height axis. (Here z-axis!!) Step 1 must now be revised. The model has now been corrected. Next, the triangle mesh can be generated. I'm fast-forwarding again. Now the 3D model is already complete and can be viewed. If you want to view the mesh, you must first activate "Triangle Meshes". I just want to view the triangulated mesh and disable the other elements. You can see that the 3D model is already close to the Google original. Now open PV*SOL premium 2018 or a higher version! I am already in the 3D visualization of PV*SOL premium and have started a new project there. Now import the 3D model you created with Pix4D. To do so, click this button. You will find the. obj file, as well as materials and texture in the project folder that Pix4D has created. I simply place the 3D model in the middle of the terrain. As you can see, the 3D model is stored in an unusual coordinate system, which has to be corrected. To do this, double-click on the model and select the "Tilt backward" option. The model has also been well imported into PV*SOL premium. Here already with representation of the shading. Now check the distance measured in Google Earth. To do this, draw a PV area polygon. As you can see, the model is not to scale. It must be corrected (see video). The alignment must also be adjusted! The building can then be covered with PV modules. End of the tutorial. Thank you for watching! The computer program shown is PV*SOL premium, a design software by Valentin Software in the field of photovoltaics / renewable energy. The priorities of this software are design support and yield calculation. The integrated 3D visualization determines the impact of shading on the yield. Another focus is on the cost-effectiveness of photovoltaic systems with and without self-consumption
  2. http://www.valentin-software.com/services/fw/yt-tut-de/dl-pvsolprem-de 1. Screenshots anfertigen in Google Earth Pro 2. Photogrammetrie mit Pix4D 3. Import des 3D-Modells in PV*SOL premium Starten Sie zunächst Google Earth Pro. Für dieses Video habe ich ein frei stehendes, relativ komplexes Gebäude in England gewählt. Ich gebe hier nun die Koordinaten des Objekts ein. Von diesem Objekt soll ein 3D-Modell extrahiert werden. Als Erstes ermittle ich die Abmessung einer Kante des Modells. Diese wird später in PV*SOL benötigt, um den Maßstab zu reproduzieren. Hierzu nutze ich die Lineal-Funktion von Google Earth und zeichne einen 3D-Pfad an eine gut sichtbare Kante. Die gemessene Länge der Kante beträgt ca. 20m. Im nächsten Schritt werde ich von der Szene ca. 30 - 40 Screenshots anfertigen, um daraus später in Pix4D ein 3D-Modell zu erstellen. Um bei der Photogrammetrie ein optimales Ergebnis zu erzielen, sollten zunächst alle Beschriftungen und Menüs ausgeblendet werden. Nun können die Screenshots angefertigt werden. Empfehlung: Machen Sie Bilder auf 3 verschiedenen Flughöhen: - 12 Bilder auf Höhe des Firstes bzw. des höchsten Punkts des Gebäudes. - 8 Bilder aus verschieden Winkeln der Vogelperspektive - 12 Bilder auf 3 Metern Höhe Achten Sie darauf, - dass das Zielgebäude immer vollständig zu sehen ist, - dass pot. zusätzliche Abschattungsobjekte zu sehen sind, - und dass die Bilder nicht zu verdreht sind. Je mehr Bilder aus verschiedensten Perspektiven anfertigt werden, desto besser ist später das erstellte 3D-Modell. Bei manchen Photogrammetrie-Programmen ist es sinnvoll, zusätzlich noch einige Nahaufnahmen zu machen. Bewegen Sie auch die Maus vorm Erstellen des Screenshots möglichst aus dem Bild, damit der Mauscursor nicht im Bild zu sehen ist! Wenn Sie die 30-40 Screenshots angefertigt haben, starten Sie anschließend Pix4Ddesktop. Sie können dieses Programm derzeit als 14 Tage-Testversion herunterladen, indem Sie sich auf: https://pix4d.com/product/pix4dmapper-photogrammetry-software/ ein Kundenkonto anlegen. Nachdem Sie Pix4Dmapper Pro gestartet haben, gelangen Sie auf die "Home"-Seite des Programms. Legen Sie als Erstes ein neues Projekt an. Es öffnet sich der Dialog "Neues Projekt". Hier können Sie den Projektordner auswählen. Hier geben Sie den Projektnamen ein. Im nächsten Schritt werden bereits die angefertigten Screenshots hinzugefügt. Klicken Sie auf "Bilder hinzufügen" Wählen Sie nun mit "Strg-A" alle Screenshots aus. Die folgende Meldung kann ignoriert werden. Hier sehen Sie nun einen Überblick über die Geodaten und das Kameramodell, welche aus den Bildern ermittelt wurden. Dadurch, dass ich Screenshots erzeugt habe, sind nicht viele Daten enthalten. Die nächsten Seiten sind derzeit nicht interessant. Klicken Sie sich weiter durch. Auf der letzten Seite sehen Sie im Überblick, welche Detailtiefe beim fertigen 3D-Modell erwartet werden kann und wie lang der Erstellungsprozess wahrscheinlich dauert. Wählen Sie noch den Menüpunkt "3D-Modelle" und klicken Sie anschließend "Finish". Es wird nun die Kartenansicht angezeigt. Diese ist derzeit uninteressant, da keine Geoinformationen in den Bildern enthalten sind. Als nächstes kann bereits das 3D-Modell erzeugt werden. Bevor ich auf Start klicke, schauen wir uns zuerst die Optionen hierfür an. Klicken Sie auf "Prozess" und anschließend auf "Prozessoptionen". Interessant sind zunächst nur die Einstellungen zum "Prozess" und zu "Punktwolke und Mesh". Die generellen Prozessoptionen lasse ich unverändert. Achten Sie darauf, dass bei "Keypoints Image Scale" --> Full gewählt ist. Mit den Einstellungen zur "Punktwolke" können Sie später etwas experimentieren, um ggf. ein noch besseren Ergebnis zu erzielen. Ich belasse die Einstellungen unverändert. An den Meshoptionen müssen ein paar Dinge angepasst werden, damit das 3D-Modell in PV*SOL premium später korrekt importiert werden kann. Ich möchte, dass die Texturen aus den Screenshots in das 3D-Modell übertragen werden. Die maximale Octree Tiefe setzen wir auf 14. Bei der Texturgröße (Textursize) sollten maximal eher 4096 Pixel eingestellt werden. Beim Detailgrad muss die maximale Anzahl Dreiecke eingeschränkt werden, da PV*SOL premium derzeit nur 3D-Modelle mit maximal 500.000 Eckpunkten akzeptiert. Das erreichen Sie mit der Dezimierungsstrategie "Sensitive". Nach Abschluss der Photogrammetrie wird automatisch eine Modell-Datei erzeugt. Hier legen sie fest, dass diese Datei im Format .obj angelegt wird. Nun kann das 3D-Modell erzeugt werden. Führen Sie zunächst nur Schritt 1 aus! Dieser Vorgang kann mehrere Minuten dauern. Ich spule vor. Sie sehen nun im Ergebnis die reproduzierten Positionen der Kamera und die Tie Points. Die Kamera-Positionen lassen sich ausblenden. Das Programm hat leider manchmal Schwierigkeiten, die korrekte Lage des Models aus den Screenshots zu ermitteln. Hier sieht man ein völlig unnatürliches Gefälle, welches korrigiert werden muss. Zur Korrektur der Ausrichtung und Neigung des Modells gibt es die Funktion "Orientation Constraints". Setzen Sie die Enden des 3D-Pfeils an eine Strecke, von der Sie wissen, dass sie parallel zur Höhenachse verläuft. (Hier z-Achse!!) Schritt 1 muss nun überarbeitet werden. Das Modell ist nun korrigiert worden. Als Nächstes kann das Dreiecks-Mesh generiert werden. ich spule wieder etwas vor. Nun ist das 3D-Modell bereits komplett und kann betrachtet werden. Wenn Sie das Mesh betrachten möchten, müssen Sie zunächst "Triangle Meshes" aktivieren. Ich möchte nur das triangulierte Mesh betrachten und deaktiviere die anderen Elemente. Sie sehen, dass das 3D-Modell schon nahe an das Google Original heranreicht. Öffnen Sie nun PV*SOL premium 2018 oder eine höherer Version! Ich befinde mich bereits in der 3D-Visualisierung von PV*SOL premium und habe dort ein neues Projekt begonnen. Importieren Sie nun das 3D-Modell, welches Sie mit Pix4D erstellt haben. Klicken Sie hierzu diesen Button. Sie finden die .obj - Datei, sowie Materialien und Textur im Projektordner, den Pix4D angelegt hat. Ich platziere das 3D-Modell einfach in die Mitte des Terrains. Wie Sie sehen, ist das 3D-Modell in einem unüblichen Koordinatensystem abgespeichert, welches korrigiert werden muss. Machen Sie dazu einen Doppelklick auf das Modell und wählen Sie die Option "Tilt backward". (Nach hinten neigen) Auch in PV*SOL premium ist das Modell gut importiert worden. Hier bereits mit Darstellung des Schattens. Überprüfen Sie nun noch die Länge der in Google Earth ausgemessenen Strecke. Zeichnen Sie dazu ein Belegungsflächen-Polygon ein. Sie sehen, dass das Modell nicht maßstabsgerecht ist. Es muss korrigiert werden (Siehe Video). Außerdem muss die Ausrichtung angepasst werden! Anschließend kann das Gebäude mit PV-Modulen belegt werden. Ende des Tutorials. Vielen Dank fürs Zuschauen! Bei dem zuletzt vorgestellten Programm handelt es sich um PV*SOL premium, eine Planungssoftware der Firma Valentin Software aus dem Bereich Photovoltaik (Regenerative Energien). Schwerpunkte dieser Software sind die Planungsunterstützung und Ertragsprognose. Mit der integrierten 3D-Visualisierung wird der Einfluss der Abschattung auf den Ertrag berücksichtigt. Ein weiterer Schwerpunkt ist die Wirtschaftlichkeit von Photovoltaikanlagen mit und ohne Eigenverbrauch.
  3. Hi Has anyone managed to use 3D imagery from Google EarthPro into suitable conversion for PVSOL 2018 to accept in 3D import? Have played around with a few other free mapping tools but does not model roofs like GoogleEarth Pro. Thanks
×
×
  • Create New...